Inside the Process...

I didn't have any ideas for anything to finish this weekend so I thought I would give a glimpse inside my process of creating. (I told you I would have ways of cheating this "one a week" thing!)

First up is the beginnings of a commission I took on. The client wants a portrait of her nephew but the only photo she could get was one of the little guy riding a rocking horse and not even looking at the camera. At first I thought "Well, THAT'S gonna be difficult" but the more I looked at the picture, the more I thought it was perfect for the way I paint. I'm not a portrait painter per se, so this little "slice of life" photo absolutely fits my strengths.

I begin the painting by gessoing over a piece of sanded down masonite. Then I pencil in the composition that I like the best.



(I kind of liked the way the scanner makes it look like a chalk sketch but it's actually just pencil.)

But I thought that wasn't enough for a post so I figured I would give a little more. As a general rule I dislike people looking through my sketchbooks. I know some artists love it but to me it's a very personal intrusion. I have a LOT of crap in these things that I never intend to see the light of day. But every now and then there is a tidbit that I like enough to share.

Now I can't give any details about this sketchbook page as it is a super secret project I am working on with a friend. But if all goes well (and it seems to be falling into place the more I work on it) you should all be able to see it VERY publicly at some point in the future.



Neither of these images goes together exactly but that's the way it looks in sketchbook form. I'll be working on one thing, then just slip over to another part of the page and start doodling away at some other idea I had. Sometimes I end up with a page of completely indecipherable lines that all blend into one another and sometimes I have sense enough to stop while I'm ahead.

I hope you've enjoyed this little glimpse into the sketch life of the Paintmonkey and I'll try to have something completed for you to look at next time.